Tapa: Situating Pacific Barkcloth in Time and Place


Home > News

show all

Tapa symposium at Auckland War Memorial Museum

8th January 2018

In an exciting new stage of the project, the barkcloth research has moved to the Pacific in recent months.  In the first instalment of our travels, Andy Mills and Frances Lennard spent two weeks in New Zealand in October, visiting collections, carrying out research and meeting barkcloth makers, curators and conservators.  Our visit was centred on Auckland, the city with the world’s largest Pacific population. 


The main focus of the visit was a tapa symposium, kindly hosted for us by Auckland War Memorial Museum and organised by Fuli Pereira, the Pacific Curator. This was a wonderful opportunity to meet contemporary artists and tapa makers of Pacific heritage and to see how contemporary art practice is inspired by tapa.  We were welcomed to the museum by the Director, Dr David Gaimster who, satisfyingly, had supported the development of the project in his former role as director of The Hunterian at the University of Glasgow! The museum has an exciting ongoing project, the Pacific Collections Access Project (PCAP) which brings Pacific knowledge holders to the museum to share knowledge and understanding of the museum’s Pacific collections, and our symposium was able to draw on this rich knowledge base.


 


After a presentation by Frances and Andy about the aims and research methods of our project, we heard individual presentations from the participants about their own experiences of working with tapa. A key theme was the makers’ experience of drawing on their heritage – information about barkcloth making has survived to a greater or lesser degree in the different island groups of the Pacific, and we heard from Glenda Vilisoni, for example, about her efforts to learn the art of her ancestors despite the long ago loss of the tradition in Niue. The participants also spoke of their determination to see the skill of barkcloth making survive and the challenge of interesting younger generations in its survival. The day was enriched with food and drink, conversation and song, and it was clear that bringing together artists and makers from different traditions in this way was extremely rewarding for all concerned.  We would like to thank the Auckland War Memorial Museum, particularly David Gaimster and Fuli Pereira, very much indeed for welcoming us and for hosting the event, and we would like to thank all the participants very warmly for sharing their knowledge with us. We hope they will keep in touch.


 


While we were in Auckland we took part in two other events. Firstly we spoke at an evening meeting at Auckland Central Library where members of the public were able to see one of the treasures of Auckland Libraries, their copy of the Alexander Shaw book of 18th century tapa samples. We are very grateful to Daren Kamali, inaugural Senior Curator Pacific at Auckland Libraries, for inviting us to take part in this event.


 


Finally we were hosted by the project Ancient Futures: late 18th and early 19th century Tongan arts and their legacies at the University of Auckland Business School where Andy led a workshop on the barkcloth garment, the malo or maro. With many thanks to our colleagues at the University, particularly Dr Billie Lythberg and Dr Phyllis Herda. We are grateful to all our colleagues in New Zealand who made our visit such an enriching and informative experience.


Frances Lennard, Project Principal Investigator


 


Matua Robert Newson meets Andy Mills.  Matua Bobby Newson welcomed the visitors to the museum on behalf of the Ngati Whatua, the local iwi or tribal group, in the mihi whakatau ceremony.


Matua Robert Newson meets Andy Mills


 


 


 


 The Fiji panel


The Fiji panel.


 


 


The symposium participants.


 


The symposium participants


 


Viewing the Shaw book at Auckland Central Library


 


Viewing the Shaw book at Auckland Central Library


 


Pacific artists, Rosanna Raymond and Numangatini MacKenzie, demonstrate different methods of tying the maro.


 


Pacific artists, Rosanna Raymond and Numangatini MacKenzie


 


Rosanna and Numangatini demonstrating methods of tying the maro


 

Other recent news items:

Two-Day Workshop at the Bishop Museum, Honolulu
29th November 2017
 More >


New Barkcloth Research at the ESfO Conference 2017
10th July 2017
Project staff and international colleagues have been publicising their barkcloth research at the 2017 ESfO conference  More >


Work at the Kew Archives is Producing Some Fascinating Insights
5th July 2017
The project's historical researcher Andy Mills has been delving into the archives of the UK's national botanical gardens at Kew  More >


Special Research Visit from Ngaa Kitai Taria Pureariki and Dr Michaela Appel
26th June 2017
Cook Islands Research Visit  More >


Adrienne Kaeppler Research Visit to Tonga
19th June 2017
Tongan kupesi design board, circa 1940  More >


Annual Advisory Committee Meeting and Museum Ethnographers Group Conference 2017
20th April 2017
The team have enjoyed a busy week hosting advisors, researchers and museum professionals here in Glasgow  More >


Volunteering for the barkcloth research project
30th March 2017
Conservation programme for the project is supported by Mphil students from Centre for Textile Conservation.  More >


Open Day 2017 - Centre for Textile Conservation and Technical Art History
29th March 2017
The barkcloth project joined the CTCTAH's open day  More >


Booking has Opened for the 2017 Museum Ethnographers Group Conference in Glasgow
20th January 2017
Tickets are now available for this year's MEG Conference in April, which we are co-hosting with the Hunterian  More >


News Archive

2018

2017

2016

2015