Bibliography

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A PDF edition of this bibliography is also available to download under CC BY-SA 4.0 for future reference.

  • Flowers, T.H., Smith, M.J and Brunton, J. (2019). Colouring of Pacific barkcloths: identification of the brown, red and yellow colourants used in the decoration of historic Pacific barkcloths. Heritage Science [online] 7(2). Available from: doi.org/10.1186/s40494-018-0243-9
  • Lennard, F., Tamura, M. and Nesbitt, M. (2017). Re-evaluating student treatments of barkcloth artefacts from the Economic Botany Collection, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. In: J. Bridgland, ed. Preprints ICOM Committee for Conservation 18th triennial meeting, Copenhagen, 2017. Paris: International Council of Museums. Available from: https://www.icom-cc-publications-online.org/PublicationList.aspx?search=lennard&wg=0&vy=Copenhagen+2017&t=0&page=1
  • Mills, A. (2018). Engaging aesthetically with tapa barkcloth in the museum. The Senses and Society 13(3): 367-374. Available from: doi.org/10.1080/17458927.2018.1516025
  • Mills, A. (2018). Cloth and costume in ethnographic museums: new directions in research, care and interpretation – an introduction. Journal of Museum Ethnography 31: 9-13
  • Smith, M.J., Holmes-Smith, A.S. and Lennard, F. (2019). Development of non-destructive methodology using ATR-FTIR with PCA to differentiate between historical Pacific barkcloth. Journal of Cultural Heritage [online] 39: 32-41. Available from: doi.org/10.1016/j.culher.2019.03.006
  • Tamura, M. (2018). Conservation of Tahitian taputa from HMS Galatea, Economic Botany Collection at Kew. In: S. Glenn and K. Smith, eds. The nature of textiles, postprints from the forum of the Icon Textile Group, 21 May 2018. London: Icon, 89-102
  • Tamura, M., Ridley, C. and Lennard, F. (eds.) (2020, forthcoming). Recent advances in barkcloth conservation and technical analysis, postprints of the symposium held at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, December 7, 2018 [online]. London: Icon Ethnography Group
  • Tamura, M. (2020, forthcoming). Situating Pacific barkcloth production in time and place – conservation programme. In: M. Tamura, C. Ridley and F. Lennard, eds. Recent advances in barkcloth conservation and technical analysis, postprints of the symposium held at Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, December 7, 2018. London: Icon Ethnography Group

  • Bisulca, C., Schattenburg-Raymond, L. and Du Preez, K. (2014). Hawaiian barkcloth from the Bishop Museum collections: a characterization of materials and techniques in collaboration with modern practitioners to effect preservation of a traditional cultural practice. Materials Research Society Proceedings [online]. 1656, 111-121. Available from: doi.org/10.1557/opl.2014.811
  • De Poulpiquet, A.-C. (2012). The conservation of a Hawaiian kapa: use of size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) for the evaluation of cellulose degradation caused by oil and sodium chloride. Journal of the Institute of Conservation [online] 35(1): 50-61. Available from: doi.org/10.1080/19455224.2012.680427
  • Flowers, T.H., Smith, M.J and Brunton, J. (2019). Colouring of Pacific barkcloths: identification of the brown, red and yellow colourants used in the decoration of historic Pacific barkcloths. Heritage Science [online] 7(2). Available from: doi.org/10.1186/s40494-018-0243-9
  • Moncada, X., Payacan, C., Arriaza, F., Lobos, S., Seelenfreund, D. and Seelenfreund, A. (2013). DNA extraction and amplification from contemporary Polynesian bark-cloth. Plos One [online] 8(2). Available from: doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0056549
  • Moskvin, I. (2017). Methods for microscopic fiber identification of Polynesian barkcloth. In: M. Charleux, ed. Tapa: from tree bark to cloth: an ancient art of Oceania: from Southeast Asia to Eastern Polynesia. Paris: Somogy, 429-435
  • Pang, B. (1992). The identification of plant fibres in Hawaiian kapa: from ethnology to botany. Master’s thesis, University of Hawai’i
  • Peña-Ahumada, B., Saldarriaga-Córdoba, M., Kardailsky, O., Moncada, X., Moraga, M., Matisoo-Smith, E., Seelenfreund, D. and Seelenfreund, A. (2020). A tale of textiles: genetic characterization of historical paper mulberry barkcloth from Oceania. Plos One [online] 15(5). Available from: doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0233113
  • Scharff, A. (1996). Mamaki tapa: identification and deterioration. Unpublished Master’s thesis, School of Conservation, Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts
  • Seelenfreund, D., Clarke, A., Oyanedel, N., Piña, R., Lobos, S., Matisoo-Smith, E. and Seelenfreund, A. (2010). Paper mulberry (Broussonetia papyrifera) as a commensal model for human mobility in Oceania:anthropological, botanical and genetic considerations. New Zealand Journal of Botany 48(3-4): 231-247
  • Seelenfreund, A., Sepúlveda, M., Petchey, F., Peña-Ahumada, B., Payacán, C., Gutiérrez, S., Cárcamo, J., Kardailsky, O., Moncada, X., María Rojas, A., Moraga, M., Matisoo-Smith, E., Seelenfreund, D. (2016). Characterization of an archaeological decorated bark cloth from Agakauitai Island, Gambier archipelago, French Polynesia. Journal of Archaeological Science One [online] 76: 56-69. Available from: doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2016.10.008
  • Smith, M.J., Holmes-Smith, A.S. and Lennard, F. (2019). Development of non-destructive methodology using ATR-FTIR with PCA to differentiate between historical Pacific barkcloth. Journal of Cultural Heritage [online] 39: 32-41. Available from: doi.org/10.1016/j.culher.2019.03.006
  • Tamburini, D., Cartwright, C.R., Melchiorre di Crescenzo , M. and Rayner, G. (2019). Scientific characterisation of the dyes, pigments, fibres and wood used in the production of barkcloth from Pacific islands. Archaeological & Anthropological Sciences 11(7): 3121–3141. Available from: doi.org/10.1007/s12520-018-0745-0
  • Tamburini, D., Cartwright, C. and Adams, J. (2019). The scientific study of the materials used to create the Tahitian mourner’s costume in the British Museum collection. Journal of Cultural Heritage [online]. Available from: doi.org/10.1016/j.culher.2019.10.007

  • Adams, J. (2016). A small piece of glazed barkcloth from the Austral Islands. In: N. Thomas, J. Adams, B. Lythberg, M. Nuku and A. Salmond, eds. Artefacts of encounter: Cook’s voyages, colonial collecting and museum histories. Dunedin: University of Otago Press
  • Addo, P.-A. (2003). God’s kingdom in Auckland: Tongan Christian dress and the expression of duty. In: C. Colchester, ed. Clothing the Pacific. 0xford: Berg, 141-163
  • Addo, P.-A. (2013). Creating a nation with cloth. Women, wealth, and tradition in the Tongan diaspora. ASAO Studies in Pacific Anthropology Vol. 4. New York, Oxford: Berghahn
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  • Andersen, J. (1907). Maori life in Aotea. Christchurch: Whitcombe and Tombs
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  • Austin Dennehy, M. (2017). Unfolding: Community scholars explore the contemporary significance of historic tapa. In: M. Charleux, ed. Tapa: from tree bark to cloth: an ancient art of Oceania: from Southeast Asia to Eastern Polynesia. Paris: Somogy, 436-441
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  • Bataille-Benguigui, M.-C. (2009). Le ‘sens’ des fibres en Océanie, écorce battue et autres végétaux. In: Tapa, écorces cosmiques d’Océanie. Musée de Cahors Henri Martin, 7-15
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  • Chapman-Mason, J.T. (2018). Solving the mysteries of tapa. Cook Island News, 14 April 2018, 12-13
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  • Clarkson, J., Pearson, S., Reynolds, P. and Warren, M. (2008). Pitcairn tapa: ’Ahu no te mau vahine no Bounty. In Ahu Sistas Exhibition à la Mairie de Arue Tahiti. Exhibition catalogue
  • Clunie, F. (1986). Yalo i Viti: Shades of Fiji: a Fiji Museum catalogue. Suva: Fiji Museum
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  • Coote, J. (2015). The Cook-voyage collections at Oxford, 1772−2015. In: J. Coote, ed. Cook-voyage collections of ‘artificial curiosities’ in Britain and Ireland, 1771-2015. Museum Ethnographers Group Occasional Paper No. 5. Oxford: Museum Ethnographers Group, 74-122
  • Corley, J.S. (2008). British press greets the King of the Sandwich Islands: Kamehameha II in London, 1824. Hawaiian Journal of History 42: 69-103
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  • Cusenier, P. (2000). Les étoffes d’écorce. In: H. Guiot et C. Stéfani , eds. ‘Uvea-Wallis. Une île pêchée par les dieux. Musée des beaux-arts de Chartres, 86-90
  • D’Alleva, A. (2005). Elite clothing and the social fabric of pre-colonial Tahiti. In: S. Küchler and G. Were, eds. The art of clothing: a Pacific experience. 1st ed. London: UCL Press, 47-60
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  • Ella, S. (1898). Polynesian native clothing. Journal of the Polynesian Society 7: 165-70
  • Eves, R. (1996). Colonialism, corporeality and character: Methodist missions and the refashioning of bodies in the Pacific. History and Anthropology 10(1): 85-138
  • Ewins, R. (1982). Fijian artefacts: Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery collection. Hobart: Tasmanian Museum
  • Ewins, R. (2014). Traditional Fijian artefacts. Illustrated with objects from public and private collections in Tasmania. Hobart: Just Pacific, in association with the Tasmanian Museum & Art Gallery and Queen Victoria Museum & Art Gallerys
  • Fanua, T.P. (1986). Tapa cloth in Tonga. Nuku‘alofa: Taulua Press
  • Favole, A. (2000). La royauté oscillante. Ethnographie et histoire de la cérémonie d’investiture du Tu’i Agaifo d’Alo (Futuna). Journal de la Société des Océanistes, 111 (2000-2): 195-218
  • Finkey, I. (1998). Wauke: Hawaiian bark cloth (kapa). Keaau, Hawaii: Ilona Finkey
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  • Fornander, A. (1919). Fornander collection of Hawaiian antiquities and folklore. Memoirs of the Bernice P. Bishop Museum No.5. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press
  • Gathercole, P., Kaeppler, A. L. and Newton, D. (1979). The art of the Pacific islands. Washington, DC: National Gallery of Art
  • Gray, S.H. (2014). Searching for Mother Hubbard: function and fashion in nineteenth century dress. Winterthur Portfolio 48(1): 29-74
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  • Guiot, H. (2009b). ‘Que la mer soit poissonneuse ! Que le ‘ulufenua soit luxuriant !’ Les tapa Mer-Terre de ‘Uvea (Wallis). In: Tapa, écorces cosmiques d’Océanie. Cahors: Musée de Cahors Henri Martin, 43-50
  • Guiot, H. (2017). Valeurs et usages des tapa non décorés de Polynésie et Fidji. In: M. Charleux, ed. Tapa: from tree bark to cloth: an ancient art of Oceania, from Southeast Asia to Eastern Polynesia. Paris: Somogy, 312-317
  • Guiot, H. (2020, in press). Barkcloth from the islands of Wallis (‘Uvea) and Futuna. F. Lennard and A. Mills, eds. Material Approaches to Polynesian Barkcloth: Cloth, Collections, Communities. Leiden: Sidestone

  • Hand, R. (2015). ‘A number of highly interesting objects’: the Cook-voyage collections of Trinity College Dublin. In: J. Coote, ed. Cook-voyage collections of ‘Artificial Curiosities’ in Britain and Ireland, 1771-2015. Museum Ethnographers Group Occasional Paper No.5. Oxford: Museum Ethnographers Group, 123-190
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  • Kaeppler, A.L. (1964). Papuan Gulf masks from the village of Muru. Baessler Archive, (Berlin) 11(2): 361-373
  • Kaeppler, A.L. (1975). The fabrics of Hawai‘i (barkcloth). Leigh-on-Sea: F. Lewis
  • Kaeppler, A.L. (1978a). ‘Artificial curiosities’ being an exposition of native manufactures collected on the three Pacific voyages of Captain James Cook, R.N. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Special Publication 65
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  • Kaeppler, A.L. (1999). From the stone age to the space age in 200 Years: Tongan art and society on the eve of the millennium. Nuku‘alofa: Tongan National Museum
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